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Kate Upton da Urlo su Sports Illustrated

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Kate Upton da Urlo su Sports Illustrated

Per la terza volta Kate Upton torna ad incantare i suoi fan attraverso le copertine di Sport Illustrated.

 

La modella 24enne, diventata famosa grazie ai suoi incredibili servizi fotografici per la rivista americana, è tornata più in forma che mai in un numero speciale che uscirà con tre variant cover.

 

 

 

Ecco il video del backstage del servizio fotografico ambientato nelle Fiji.

 

 

Kate di recente ha iniziato a postare sul proprio profilo Instagram i video con gli esercizi fisici che sta adottando per mantenere il suo corpo in forma.

 

Il suo personal trainer, Ben Bruno, racconta che Kate si allena 6 giorni a settimana seguendo un tipo di workout basato su un lento sovraccarico progressivo dei pesi e della difficoltà degli esercizi svolti.

 

Ragazze, basta solo seguire i video. Facilissimo.

 

 

#Repost @benbrunotraining ・・・ Kate Upton (@kateupton) demonstrates an assisted 1 arm/1 leg row with great technique. While rows are ostensibly an upper body exercise, this is more of full body exercise that also works the glutes, hamstrings, hip stabilizers, and core, giving you a great bang for your buck. I’ve found that for most clients, true 1 arm/1 leg rows become too much of a balance exercise to get much of a training effect, but using the foam roller for assistance helps just enough with balance that you can use substantial weights without worrying about tipping over. In fact, after getting the hang of the movement, most of my female clients can use almost the same weight on this exercise that they use for traditional dumbbell rows on the bench, so it’s by no means a foo-foo exercise. When you progress to more challenging weights, you’ll feel the glutes working like crazy, and as a nice bonus, I’ve noticed that as a byproduct, clients tend to improve their single leg RDL form, allowing them to progress to bigger weights there as well. There’s a tendency to want to open up the hips to the side of the working arm and flare the toes out to the side (I call this the “peeing dog”), but to get maximum benefit for the hips and core, the key is to keep your body as still as possible with your hips and torso square.

Un post condiviso da Kate Upton (@kateupton) in data:

 

Reppin @britneyspears #workbitch @benbrunotraining ・・・ Kate Upton (@kateupton) crushes some heavy landmine bench squats with great technique. Strong! Taller lifters, and particularly those with proportionally longer femurs, tend to struggle to stay upright with traditional squats and often default to folding forward, which puts a lot of undue strain on the lower back. Using the landmine helps to stay more upright to protect the lower back, and the arc of the bar helps encourage more of a posterior weight shift to work the glutes more while also taking stress off the knees. As an added bonus, loading in this manner is also a great way to work the anterior core and upper back. Squatting to a bench serves the dual purpose of being a depth gauge to ensure a full range of motion while also helping to aid with form.

Un post condiviso da Kate Upton (@kateupton) in data:

 

 

Eating a donut while working out… I’m playing for the tie #donuts #balance 🍩🍩🍩🍩

Un post condiviso da Kate Upton (@kateupton) in data:

 

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